Elementary School

In this tab you can find activities, games, stories, and resources to engage your children according to different age levels. These resources can help your child get excited about reading and learning to read.

These activities are targeted for Elementary School ages.


ColorinColorado – Help Your Child Learn to Read

There are lots of ways that you can help your children learn to read!  From the time that they are babies to the time that they are in high school, there are many little steps you can take along the way — rhyming  and singing songs, reading out loud, sounding out letters, going to the library, and reading books together in your home language.  Helping your children learn to read might also mean finding support if they are having difficulty, which can affect their future success. This site is filled with tips for what you can do at home, fun activities, suggestions for choosing books to share together, and ideas on how you can prepare your child for a lifetime and love of reading.

colorincolorado Help Your Child Learn to Read


Learning About Your Child’s Reading Development

Learning to read is difficult. While spoken language develops in most cases naturally, reading requires explicit, systematic instruction. This page from The National Center on Improving Literacy, describes typical reading development from emergent through fluent reading. Sometimes we have concerns. This article offers a quick overview of the skills to look for and what to do if the child in your life seems to not be acquiring the skills.

What Should Children Learn?


The Development of Phonological Skills

Basic listening skills and “word awareness” are critical precursors to phonological awareness. Learn the milestones for acquiring phonological skills. This page helps parents to understand the importance of developmental phonological skills through easy to understand definitions. There is also a table which notes the age where 80 to 90 percent of typical students have achieved each phonological skill.

phonological-skills


Activities – Helping Your Child Become a Reader

This page from the U.S. Department of Education provides ideas for language-building activities to do to develop literacy skills. The activities and roles for both children and parents change as the child grows. The different stages addressed are: babies (birth to 1 year), toddlers (1 to 3 years), preschoolers ( ages 3 and 4) and kindergarten/early first graders (ages 5 and 6).As a parent, you can help your child want to learn in a way no one else can. That desire to learn is a key to your child’s later success. Enjoyment is important! So, if you and your child don’t enjoy one activity, move on to another. You can always return to any activity later on.

Activities – Helping Your Child Become a Reader


Defining Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a brain-based learning disability that specifically impairs a person’s ability to read. For individuals with dyslexia, specific portions of the brain typically associated with important reading processes may not function in the same ways that they do in individuals without dyslexia. Individuals with dyslexia often have difficulty with phonological processing, spelling, or rapid visual-verbal responding. Importantly, dyslexia is related to reading difficulties, not difficulties that arise from intellectual functioning.

Defining Dyslexia


Welcome to Ohio’s BOLD Beginning!

Now you have an easy way to access all things related to early childhood in Ohio’s state agencies! This site is a resource for all people interacting with young children — whether a parent, grandparent, caretaker, teacher, child care provider — there is valuable information for all.

Ohio’s Bold Beginning


Getting Involved with Your Child’s Learning

Family involvement strengthens student learning and improves academic achievement. Students with active family support have better attendance, pass more classes and earn more credits resulting in higher grade point averages and higher test scores.

Getting Involved with Your Child’s Learning


Ohio Department of Education- Parents

Active, involved parents are an essential resource for Ohio’s schools in making the most of every child’s educational experience, from pre-kindergarten all the way through high school. This page has information you can use to help guide your child’s education.

My Child is in…Preschool, Kindergarten, Elementary School, etc.


A Child Becomes a Reader: Proven Ideas from Research for Parents Kindergarten through Grade 3

The road to becoming a reader begins the day a child is born and continues through the end of third grade. At that point, a child must read with ease and understanding to take advantage of the learning opportunities in fourth grade and beyond—in school and in life. Learning to read and write starts at home, long before children go to school. Very early, children begin to learn about the sounds of spoken language when they hear their family members talking, laughing, and singing, and when they respond to all of the sounds that fill their world. They begin to understand written language when they hear adults read stories to them and see adults reading newspapers, magazines, and books for themselves.

A Child Becomes a Reader for Parents Kindergarten through Grade 3


Family and Community Toolbox

The purpose of the Family and Community Toolbox is to provide resources in order to build upon the natural learning opportunities that occur within a child’s daily routine in the home and community. The resources contained in this toolbox provide encouragement to families and caregivers in supporting the early language and literacy development of children in their care.

Family and Community Toolbox


Parent Guide to Helping Your Child Learn to Read for Preschool through Grade Three

Success in school starts with reading.  When children become good readers in the early grades, they are more likely to become better learners throughout their school years and beyond. Learning to read is hard work for children. Fortunately, research is now available that suggests how to give each child a good start in reading.

Put Reading First – Parent Guide


How to Raise a Reader

Read out loud, every day. Any book.

You can read anything to a newborn: a cookbook, a dystopian novel, a parenting manual. The content doesn’t matter. What does matter is the sound of your voice, the cadence of the text and the words themselves. Research has shown that the number of words an infant is exposed to has a direct impact on language development and literacy. But here’s the catch: The language has to be live, in person and directed at the child. Turning on a television, or even an audiobook, doesn’t count. Sure, it’s good to get started reading aloud the children’s books that will be part of your child’s library. But don’t feel limited. Just be sure to enjoy yourself.

How to Raise a Reader